Geographic reach

Republic of Buryatiya

Key sectors:
226
bln rubles
GRP
229
thousand rubles
GRP/person
71
bln rubles
Investments

Magadan region

Key sectors:
170
bln rubles
GRP
1196
thousand rubles
GRP/person
35
bln rubles
Investments

Chukotka aut. Region

Key sectors:
78
bln rubles
GRP
1578
thousand rubles
GRP/person
25
bln rubles
Investments

Kamchatka region

Key sectors:
236
bln rubles
GRP
750
thousand rubles
GRP/person
47
bln rubles
Investments

The Russian Far East is the common name for 11 Russian regions constituting the Far Eastern Federal District. These include the Amur Region, Jewish Autonomous Region, Kamchatka Territory, Magadan Region, Primorye Territory, Republic of Sakha (Yakutia), Sakhalin Region, Khabarovsk Territory, Chukotka Autonomous Area, Zabaykalsky Territory, and Republic of Buryatia. The total area of the Far Eastern Federal District is 6,952.5 thous km², which is more than 40% of the total area of Russia.

The natural and climatic conditions in each region of the Russian Far East show sharp contrasts and are unique, as its territory spreads 4,500 km north to south and 2,500–3,000 km west to east. This provides ample opportunity for the development of agriculture, fishing, and tourism. The highest-potential tourist centers (Vladivostok, Khabarovsk, Blagoveshchensk, Ulan-Ude, Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky) have basic infrastructure to accommodate tourists travelling by air and water.

Its unique geographic location ensures that the Russian Far East serves as a strategic link between the West European, North American, and booming Asia countries.

The Russian Far East is the national resource base accommodating huge natural reserves: deposits of diamonds, gold and other precious metals, copper, coal, and rare-earth metals. The Far Eastern offshore areas abound in oil and gas. The Far East accounts for about a quarter of Russia’s total commercial wood reserves. The Far Eastern Federal District is the leader for fish and seafood production among all regions of Russia: over a half of Russia’s total fish output is produced in the waters of the Pacific.

The infrastructural bedrock of the Russian Far East is the Trans-Siberian Railway (longest railway line in the world with a length of 9,298.2 km), the Northern Sea Route (the shortest sea route between Europe and the Pacific Region), and Far Eastern sea ports.

In his Address to the Federal Assembly, Russian President Vladimir Putin framed the development of the Russian Far East as Russia’s national priority for the entire 21st century. Today, the macroregion has created an unprecedented environment to attract Russian and foreign investments in industrial and infrastructural projects. The government is implementing a large-scale program of Advanced Special Economic Zones providing for special tax preferences for their residents. Pursuant to the Russian President’s instruction, Vladivostok was granted the status of a free port with a favorable simplified customs and tax regime.

The Arctic Region occupies 18% of Russia’s area and consists of the Murmansk Region, Komi Republic, Nenets, Chukotka, and Yamalo-Nenets Autonomous Areas, individual districts of the Republic of Sakha (Yakutia), Norilsk, two districts of the Krasnoyarsk Territory, and municipalities of the Arkhangelsk Region. Besides, the Russian Arctic Region includes certain islands and archipelagoes of the Arctic Ocean. Russia accounts for a half of the area and water basin limited by the Arctic Circle.

The Arctic Region is crossed by the Northern Sea Route and Northern Air Bridge connecting Asia to North America.

The Arctic Region has rich mineral reserves: it produces 80% of natural gas, 60% of oil, 97% of diamonds, 90% of nickel and cobalt, and 60% of copper produced in Russia.

The Arctic Region generates 22% of Russia’s total exports.

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